Diabetics in School: Tips

Diabetes is a very common disease and most people know at least one or two of us.

Just a heads up, if you’re not one and you know diabetics… Don’t you ever imply or say out blatantly that it is not important. Not only does it hurt, but it’s completely ignorant of you. Diabetes Mellitus (type 1) is #7 in death causes worldwide, so it is not to be taken lightly.

I’ve been diabetic ever since the two years of age, so I’m not new to this. Always remember that in medicine, and diabetes is no different, two plus two doesn’t always turn out to be four. From one day to another, you may see enormous differences that may startle you, but don’t you worry, I’ve got your back here.

1. Go to your doctor regularly

I can’t stress this enough. I’m one of those people (aren’t we all?) that hates going to the doctors, but we just have to. Maybe it’s weekly (like I’m doing lately), maybe it’s monthly, maybe it’s annually… It depends on how you’re doing and how your doctor wants to handle you. Do always remember that if you see your disease uncontrolled and your doctor can’t help, you can, and should, switch.

Also, when you’re there, give them your full attention and tell them everything. Without every fact, they can’t do their job. They can’t guess for you, but they’re there to help you as you need it.

2. Tests, tests, tests!

I think I’m talking based on my latest experience with a new doctor, but it is important to take tests everyday at least twice. For example, I have to take six daily; one before and after each every meal. You may need more, you may need less. It doesn’t matter; take them! Even if you’re feeling odd in the middle of Maths class and it’s not due, do it.

3. Take all you need to school and have the talk with your teachers

Taking everything with you at all times, most specially school, is very important. In Spain, the canteens aren’t allowed to have sugary food and therefore there wouldn’t be a Coca Cola for me if I didn’t take it there myself.

Talk to your school’s teachers and they’ll even let you keep your drink(s) in the fridge. Also, having them informed on your disease (AKA the talk, as I used to call it) is also highly recommended. You want them to know how to react if you have a sudden change of moods, you start trembling or you drop on the floor.

Having switched schools a couple times, I know what I’m talking about. As my mum is a Primary teacher, I used to be at her school before I first switched during Year 4. No family with me, though the hospital was just down the road.

We (my parents and my 9-year-old self) had a meeting with most of the teachers in the school. During that time, we told the teachers how my character usually is and that it would be very convenient for them to look out for any weird behavior (crying, shouting…). I’d be told to take a test. I had full-on permission to go to the bathroom or the office if I wasn’t feeling okay, with a classmate. If I ever had a big BS drop, which I sadly did, they were to give me a glass of water with sugar stirred into it if I could still swallow and then take me to hospital so I could be taken care of properly.

When I switched again, my sister was there and the rest of the teachers knew that they were to call her if anything happened. Having them know that you are to be let out to the bathroom is very important, since highs can also happen and should be taken care of as well.

Have handy some sweets in your pockets or your bag. As a girl, I used to take a second messenger bag in addition to my school bag where I’d have my full kit (glucometer, needles, insulin) and a few sweets for me to have if I had a BS (blood sugar) drop in the middle of a lesson.

If you know you’re not okay, tell your teacher. Raise your hand or have your classmate do it to inform them and be let outside to the bathroom or the office, so you can call your parents if you need to as well as taking care of the situation.

4. P.E

Talk to your P.E teacher so they’re aware that if you’re too high (+250mg/dL) or too low (-80mg/dL), you aren’t allowed to do any sport. If you do, in the first case, your sugar will keep on rising to the clouds; in the second one, it will drop to the floor. Having a juice close is essential for this class. Water is, too, for a high, so make sure you have that handy, too.

5. Fitting in

It’s already hard enough to fit in at school as it is, so having diabetes is a little add-on to that fear of not being like the rest. Let’s be realistic, we are not like the rest. Grab a pack of tissues and cry the pain out while you’re alone. It hurts and it’s hard. Why us? Well, there’s no answer at all. No human is free of diseases or imperfections, so let’s please get that out of our heads now.

You can and will fit in when you know you’re you and not a disease. Do not let that define you. You have to own it and make it depend on what you’re going to do for the day. You’re having a P.E class in the morning and woke up with a reasonable BS level? Make it work for you; reduce insulin, eat a little more, maybe do as usual with a juice right after.

Diabetes is quite annoying since what works today won’t work next week but it doesn’t mean you can’t control it as you wish. Again, you can and you will.

Comment down below if you’re diabetic and what are other tips for handling diabetes at school!

Consejos para los Estudiantes Universitarios Españoles de Primer Año

La Universidad en España no tiene nada que ver con la Americana ni con la Inglesa, seamos realistas. Si buscamos en Pinterest algo relacionado con la Universidad, salen listas y consejos en inglés o para otros países. Yo misma escribo este blog en ese idioma, pero me parecía que hacía falta un artículo así en internet para aquellas personas que estén tan perdidas como yo.

Para empezar, nos hace falta un papel y un bolígrafo para poder hacer la estructura general que ya conocemos de nuestra carrera. Si no, mira en la página oficial de tu Universidad e infórmate de cómo está estructurada tu carrera el primer año al menos.

Pregúntate cosas como: ¿me hará falta una calculadora científica, programable o ninguna?, ¿me vendrá mejor un calendario o una agenda?, ¿me va mejor apuntar con el ordenador, la tablet o a mano? Así podrás averiguar más sobra qué es lo que necesitas.

Una lista general de cosas que puedes necesitar en la Universidad (juzgando por las que hacen en otros países y más o menos lo que nos puede venir bien):

  • Lápices número 2 o portaminas.
  • Goma y sacapuntas.
  • Bolígrafos de color negro/azul.
  • Una calculadora (incluso los de magisterio la necesitan).
  • Papel, cuadriculado o no.
  • Una o dos libretas para tomar apuntes o hacer resúmenes.
  • Un calendario o una agenda. (Hablo sobre esto más adelante.)
  • Un ordenador o una tablet.
  • Los libros (si no salen aún en la página o no te han dado una lista, ya te lo dirán. Puede ser que vaya por PowerPoint.)
  • Una mochila y un estuche.
  • Una impresora y cartuchos de tinta.

Además, para aquellas personas que son muy organizadas y tienen afán por tener los apuntes visualmente agradables:

  • Bolígrafos de colores Staedtler/Stabilo de punta fina.
  • Subrayadores de varios colores.
  • Post-its, banderitas post-its.
  • Archivador o carpeta y separadores.

En cuanto a la agenda o el calendario, es bastante importante por lo que he leído. Planear con antelación en la Universidad cualquier trabajo o ejercicio que manden es más que imprescindible. Si la semana que viene tienes dos trabajos por entregar, empieza esta semana y “quítatelo de encima”. Además, estudiar día a día un poco (tampoco nos pasemos) nos llevará a estar muchísimo más relajados cuando lleguen los exámenes en Enero, Junio y Julio.

Las agendas pueden ser las “típicas del chino” que llegan a ser sosas y poco motivadoras, o como las de Kate Spade o Bando.

Cuando te dan el calendario de las asignaturas, apúntalo. Cuando te den algún ejercicio para mañana o dentro de dos semanas, apúntalo. “Ya me acordaré”… No.

Suerte en todo y seguíd organizados para sacar las mejores notas posibles.

How to: Use a Planner as a College Student

Being unable to move after a surgery even in your own home makes you surf the web like a pro. I’ve searched a lot of stuff in the last hour and that includes the college tags on Pinterest. I cannot being to say how much Pinterest makes life ten times easier. So, today I am still hung up on the planner I talked about on my last post from Kate Spade. This woman is a queen and deserves a freaking monument made in her honor. The “I AM VERY BUSY” planners make my heart ache as well as the one I mentioned I’m going to buy.

You’d think I’ve used a planner before, but I haven’t. I used journals back at school and I’d jot down every piece of homework I had to do. I’m not very consistent on that so I’d miss out on a lot of those when I started to lose motivation. To start off using a planner, I’m going to set some steps that I’ll make sure to follow as much as I can. On a little side note, remember you’re not obliged to do this ever but being organized will help you out in life so making a tiny weeny of effort now will pay off. Routines are built within three weeks so let’s get down to it.

Step 1: Find the one

Go through your favorite store’s planners, see if one fits what you’re looking for. If they don’t, surf the web and find it! If it’s a bit into the pricey side, try to gather enough money and get it before your college starts. You want to find one that includes more or less from this August to December next year (these are the 17-month planners!). Make sure you’ll be able to start from the moment you arrive there, guys!

As I said on my previous post, you’re going to have to be very aware of your email and syllabus. This is going to be very important for the next steps so make sure to be very conscious about both things at all times.

Step 2: Fill it in

Once your planner has arrived and you’re jumping around in your room all happy, you should grab your syllabus and write down everything listed on the due dates. I recommend color-coding. Why, you’d ask, or how am I going to keep it up.

Well color-coding makes everything easier to scan through. You can write a legend and add it into your planner with a simple DIY so you can move it around as you go.


  1. Grab a piece of paper or cardboard and cut it so it fits your planner as you want it to.
  2. Punch some holes into it after measuring the spaces to meet your journal’s and cut slits in the middle so you can slip it into the book.
  3. Write down the color-code you like best (you can get some inspo on Pinterest or on Tumblr’s studyblr community!).
  4. Slip it in!


Step 3: Make the most out of it

Whether your planner has a meal list, shopping list, to-do list, or any other extras, make the most out of it! You bought it, so use it! I know that if I want to, I’ll keep it up. So, keep yourself motivated, enjoy those colors and stickers you’re using on your lovely planner. Add in your doctor’s appointments, your workout schedule, your blog/online/writing/creative duties, some friends outing, important occasions like your family’s and friends’ birthday… It will be part of your life, because it actually holds all your life! You’ll definitely love it. You can even add the books you’re interested in purchasing and reading! Just make it work for you and make it comfortable.

If a planner is not your ideal thing, go for a wall-calendar or use an online planner or calendar, such as Google Calendar or One Note. I’m currently using the latter for to-do lists and it really does help. Though, I’m one of those people that like to cross out something on a paper and feel a huge satisfaction out of it.

Also, if you lose motivation for it, go through Pinterest and some blogs and you’ll definitely want to pick your planner back up! Or even check on this blog, I’ll definitely have some stuff gathered for you to fall in love with your agenda once again.

Comment down below if you’ve got any planners and tell me how you use them! I’d love to see your creativity with these. Have a great day!

First Year of College Tips and Lists

Hello, guys!

This is my nth time making a blog during my short lifetime but this is a blog I’m at least mentally hoping to keep up during my college/university years (and maybe even further on!).

As this is my first post, I’m going to be introducing myself a little, too. My name is Maria and I’m going to be a starting college in the fall, which I’m very excited about. I’m quite young and not a native English speaker, but I’m going to try my best to make the least mistakes possible.

On to the actual deal now. I’m guessing there’s thousands of people (maybe even millions) that are just as eager, scared and overall confused regarding what to spend money on for their first year. I’ve been told so many times about how university is so much different from high school in pretty much everything, from classes, ways to study to people, attitude and seriousness.
In high school, your teachers are ON FREAKING TOP OF YOU SO YOU DO YOUR HOMEWORK. At least, that’s my experience and I hated it. I’m very capable of being responsible all by myself and handing in my assignment when it’s due.

Therefore, let’s keep our minds, eyes and ears open. Check your university’s page and your email DIALY because there may be some change of plans and you should be up to date.

Now, in Spain, you have five classes per semester in your own field. But fix this to your own schedule and subjects. Mine is Computer Science, so let’s go with that example. I have five classes regarding Computers, most of them including algebra or regarding mathematics.

Now that we are up to date with everything and have an overall look into our degree, we need a supplies list.

The general side to this list:

  • A planner.

Why is this in bold, you’d think? Well, planners are so, so important. I’ve never used one like the ones I’ve seen on Pinterest before, but believe me when I say you’ll need this as soon as you grasp the concept. I’m going to be earning money for a Kate Spade planner. I’ve seen others going around that also look amazing, but I can’t spend $50 or $70 on a planner when I have to buy all of the list. There’s amazing things of hers’ on the site that you should check out and maybe buy if you can afford.

  • Washi tape, sticky notes and flags, colorful stickers.
  • Colorful pens/markers, highlighters.
  • Mechanical pencils/no. 2 pencils.
  • Ballpoint pens for note-taking. (I’ll most definitely be re-writing notes with the other colorful pens. Great study work!)
  • Notepads/notebooks.
  • Books (check for used ones if you can’t afford new ones!).
  • Paper clips – every single kind there is!, tape, staples.
  • White/notebook paper.
  • Scissors, stapler.
  • Printer, ink cartridges.
  • Manila folders (there’s some Kate Spade ones that are sooo pretty!).
  • 2/3/4 binder, hole-puncher.

As my subjects lean very into Science, I’m going to possibly need a graphic calculator, too. You might want to get a scientific one if any of your classes have simple mathematics, even if your degree isn’t maths-related.

I’m going to be living with my parents, as a bus stops close-by and travels all the way to my university every morning, afternoon, evening and night (depending on the students’ schedule – some have to go in the afternoon). But I know about dorms, so you might want to check everything your university will let you have there (microwave, coffee-machine…) so you can jot down a list for different things: kitchen, bathroom, bedroom, desk and laundry. The desk part we’ve got almost covered up on the previous list.

Kitchen: again, check for what you’re allowed to take: mini-fridge, microwave, coffee-machine… You’ll anyway have to have some dry food or food that won’t go to waste in two days after arriving there as well as some zip lock transparent bags. Of course you’ll need glasses at least, maybe a few dishes and cutlery. Check if you can take a water purifier pitcher as well!

Bathroom: packing a bag of toiletries wouldn’t hurt at all. In it, you can store your beauty essentials (creams, basic makeup, nail polish, gel, shampoo, conditioner…), a pair or two of flip-flops in case you have common bathrooms, two or three towels (big and small), hairdryer, straighteners/curl wand…

Bedroom: bedsheets, a couple blankets, a beanbag, a good-sized mirror, pretty pillows and cushions, a bed-side lamp, flowers… For your wardrobe, you’ll definitely want to pack lightly thanks to the rest of stuff that’s already too much for you to handle. I’d recommend five or six complete outfits, i.e. a black long-sleeved basic shirt, a flowy, knee-length black and white stped skirt, tights and cute flats. That’d be one outfit. Make them simple so you can combine all of them and they definitely have to be as comfortable for you as possible; leggings and a hoodie is good for me most of the time.

Desk: we’ve already set the essentials up on our list, so this is just a filler for dorm rooms. You would want to take your laptop, tablet, phone with you with the respective cases and accessories (mouse, keyboard for some tablets, chargers and headphones). I’d suggest for you to have a small hand sanitizer with you at all times. You never know when you’ll need it.


We’re done with the listing, all there’s left to do is gather some motivation and keep ourselves calm until the day comes. I’ll keep on posting about college tips and tricks as I go along hunting through Pinterest, Tumblr and other bloggers. Any mention to Kate Spade is in no way promotion, it’s just me loving her chic and girly products.

Comment if you have anything you’d like to add to the lists or you’ve got some tips and tricks to share! I’d love to have someone with experience also commenting about what the first year of college is like.